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Long-Awaited Guide is Now Available to Help Parents Prevent High-Risk Behaviors in Children
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Long-Awaited Guide is Now Available to Help Parents Prevent High-Risk Behaviors in Children

Former HHCI Murphy-Petersen Behavioral Health Fellow, Dr. Crystal Collier, announces the release of her fellowship project The NeuroWhereAbouts Guide.

Long-Awaited Guide is Now Available to Help Parents Prevent High-Risk Behaviors in Children

Imagine being able to prevent risky behavior in teenagers and college students by using developmentally sound science at key ages. In The NeuroWhereAbouts Guide, created through her Murphy-Petersen Behavioral Health Fellowship at the Hope and Healing Center & Institute, Dr. Crystal Collier advises adults who want to set healthy boundaries and limits regarding the many risky behaviors faced by today’s youth, and what those limits should look like at each phase of brain development. The 428-page book is written in infographic style for easy learning and was released today in paperback.

In the guide, Dr. Collier shows what healthy brain development looks like, how risky behaviors can derail that trajectory, and what to do to keep development on track. The NeuroWhereAbouts Guide puts at parents’ fingertips the developmentally appropriate prevention science needed to set children up for success from elementary school to college.

“Over the years, I’ve repeatedly heard parents say they wanted to speak openly with their children about those hard topics—from anxiety, body image issues and divorce to pornography, binge drinking and illegal drug use, but were unsure of what to say during those conversations,” Dr. Collier explained. “The NeuroWhereAbouts Guide applies science to aide parents with discussing these risky behaviors, early and often. It even includes tools, activities, sample contracts and scripted talks for 18 high-risk behavior topics.”

This is the practical information parents, teachers and counselors need to be ‘Brain-Savvy’ — to know what prevention measures to take and when to help kids make healthy choices for life.

“At first, I thought my daughter was too young to discuss certain topics until I learned from The NeuroWhereAbouts Guide that those behaviors peaked in middle school. Then, Dr. Collier made it simple to have the talk by providing a script and checklist to help me remember what to discuss,” Shawne Moore, parent of an 11-year-old, said.

a picture of Crystal Collier, PhD, LPC-S, former Murphy-Peterson Behavioral Health Fellow at the Hope and Healing Center & Institute
Crystal Collier, PhD, LPC-S, Murphy-Peterson Behavioral Health Fellow at the Hope and Healing Center & Institute

About Dr. Crystal Collier
Former HHCI Murphy-Petersen Behavioral Health Fellow, Crystal Collier, PhD, herself a person in long-term recovery, is a therapist and educator who has been working with adolescents and adults suffering from mental illness, behavioral problems and substance use disorders since 1991. Her area of expertise includes adolescent brain development, prevention programming, parent coaching, addiction, family-of-origin work, and training new clinicians. In 2019, the Houston Counseling Association named her ‘Counselor of the Year’. She possesses a bachelor’s degree in Psychology, a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology, and a doctorate in Counselor Education. For more information on Dr. Collier and her book The NeuroWhereabouts Guide, click here.


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Watch Dr. Crystal Collier's webinar How to Keep Your Children Mentally Healthy During Quarantine hosted by The Parish School.

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